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Mockingjay (The Final Book of the Hunger Games) by Suzanne Collins

Mockingjay (The Hunger Games) by Suzanne Collins ebook epub/pdf/prc/mobi/azw3 free download

Mockingjay (The Hunger Games) by Suzanne Collins ebook epub/pdf/prc/mobi/azw3 free download

Mockingjay is a 2010 science fiction novel by American author Suzanne Collins. It is the last installment of The Hunger Games, following 2008’s The Hunger Games and 2009’s Catching Fire. The book continues the story of Katniss Everdeen, who agrees to unify the districts of Panem in a rebellion against the tyrannical Capitol. The hardcover and audiobook editions of Mockingjay were published by Scholastic on August 24, 2010, six days after the ebook edition went on sale. The book sold 450,000 copies in the first week of release, exceeding the publisher’s expectations. It received a generally positive reaction from critics.

The novel was adapted into two films, with The Hunger Games:

Mockingjay – Part 1 released in November 2014 and The Hunger Games:

Mockingjay – Part 2 released a year later.

Against all odds, Katniss Everdeen has survived the Hunger Games twice. But now that she’s made it out of the bloody arena alive, she’s still not safe. The Capitol is angry. The Capitol wants revenge. Who do they think should pay for the unrest? Katniss. And what’s worse, President Snow has made it clear that no one else is safe either. Not Katniss’s family, not her friends, not the people of District 12. Powerful and haunting, this thrilling final installment of Suzanne Collins’s groundbreaking The Hunger Games trilogy promises to be one of the most talked about books of the year.

Amazon.com Review

Against all odds, Katniss Everdeen has survived the Hunger Games twice. But now that she’s made it out of the bloody arena alive, she’s still not safe. The Capitol is angry. The Capitol wants revenge. Who do they think should pay for the unrest? Katniss. And what’s worse, President Snow has made it clear that no one else is safe either. Not Katniss’s family, not her friends, not the people of District 12. Powerful and haunting, this thrilling final installment of Suzanne Collins’s groundbreaking The Hunger Games trilogy promises to be one of the most talked about books of the year.

A Q&A with Suzanne Collins, Author of Mockingjay (The Final Book of The Hunger Games)

Q: You have said from the start that The Hunger Games story was intended as a trilogy. Did it actually end the way you planned it from the beginning?

A: Very much so. While I didn’t know every detail, of course, the arc of the story from gladiator game, to revolution, to war, to the eventual outcome remained constant throughout the writing process.

Q: We understand you worked on the initial screenplay for a film to be based on The Hunger Games. What is the biggest difference between writing a novel and writing a screenplay?

A: There were several significant differences. Time, for starters. When you’re adapting a novel into a two-hour movie you can’t take everything with you. The story has to be condensed to fit the new form. Then there’s the question of how best to take a book told in the first person and present tense and transform it into a satisfying dramatic experience. In the novel, you never leave Katniss for a second and are privy to all of her thoughts so you need a way to dramatize her inner world and to make it possible for other characters to exist outside of her company. Finally, there’s the challenge of how to present the violence while still maintaining a PG-13 rating so that your core audience can view it. A lot of things are acceptable on a page that wouldn’t be on a screen. But how certain moments are depicted will ultimately be in the director’s hands.

Q: Are you able to consider future projects while working on The Hunger Games, or are you immersed in the world you are currently creating so fully that it is too difficult to think about new ideas?

A: I have a few seeds of ideas floating around in my head but–given that much of my focus is still on The Hunger Games–it will probably be awhile before one fully emerges and I can begin to develop it.

Q: The Hunger Games is an annual televised event in which one boy and one girl from each of the twelve districts is forced to participate in a fight-to-the-death on live TV. What do you think the appeal of reality television is–to both kids and adults?

A: Well, they’re often set up as games and, like sporting events, there’s an interest in seeing who wins. The contestants are usually unknown, which makes them relatable. Sometimes they have very talented people performing. Then there’s the voyeuristic thrill—watching people being humiliated, or brought to tears, or suffering physically–which I find very disturbing. There’s also the potential for desensitizing the audience, so that when they see real tragedy playing out on, say, the news, it doesn’t have the impact it should.

Q: If you were forced to compete in the Hunger Games, what do you think your special skill would be?

A: Hiding. I’d be scaling those trees like Katniss and Rue. Since I was trained in sword-fighting, I guess my best hope would be to get hold of a rapier if there was one available. But the truth is I’d probably get about a four in Training.

Q: What do you hope readers will come away with when they read The Hunger Games trilogy?

A: Questions about how elements of the books might be relevant in their own lives. And, if they’re disturbing, what they might do about them.

Q: What were some of your favorite novels when you were a teen?

A: A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith

The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers

Nineteen Eighty Four by George Orwell

Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy

Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut

A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle

Lord of the Flies by William Golding

Boris by Jaapter Haar

Germinal by Emile Zola

Dandelion Wine by Ray Bradbury

From School Library Journal

Grade 7 Up Following her subversive second victory in the Games, this one composed of winners from past years, Katniss has been adopted by rebel factions as their symbol for freedom and becomes the rallying point for the districts in a desperate bid to take down the Capitol and remove President Snow from power. But being the Mockingjay comes with a price as Katniss must come to terms with how much of her own humanity and sanity she can willingly sacrifice for the cause, her friends, and her family. Collins is absolutely ruthless in her depictions of war in all its cruelty, violence, and loss, leaving readers, in turn, repulsed, shocked, grieving and, finally, hopeful for the characters they’ve grown to empathize with and love. Mockingjay is a fitting end of the series that began with The Hunger Games (2008) and Catching Fire (2009) and will have the same lasting resonance as William Golding’s Lord of the Flies and Stephen King’s The Stand. However, the book is not a stand-alone; readers do need to be familiar with the first two titles in order to appreciate the events and characters in this one. Jane Henriksen Baird, Anchorage Public Library, AK (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Review by The New York Times

What if the future were a giant reality television show in which children were pitted against each other in an elaborate fight to the death, in which politics, war and entertainment had finally become indistinguishable? This is the question raised by Suzanne Collins’s brutal and absorbing “Hunger Games” trilogy, and answered in the much anticipated final installment, “Mockingjay.”­

The premise of the series is that a corrupt and decadent Capitol rules over 12 impoverished districts in Panem, in the ruins of North America. Every year the Capitol authorities stage a “reaping,” in which a girl and a boy from each district are chosen by lottery to be tributes in the Hunger Games. When her younger sister is picked, the heroine, Katniss Everdeen, volunteers to take her place, and with the others is styled, trained and then placed in a spectacularly designed high-tech arena, to fight in the televised games until only one contestant survives.

Though the “Hunger Games” trilogy has by now won many adult readers — there are 5.6 million copies of the series in print in the United States and Canada — it is the perfect teenage story with its exquisitely refined rage against the cruel and arbitrary power of the adult world. One might think that “Mockingjay,” in which Katniss is finally saved from the Games and delivered to the revolutionary forces to become their figurehead, would offer some redemption, but it turns out the rebels are just as morally ambiguous as Panem’s leaders. The full-scale revolution is being sold on television to the disheartened and oppressed districts, in carefully produced spots with labels like “Because you know who they are and what ­they do.”

Mockingjay” is not as impeccably plotted as “The Hunger Games,” but none­theless retains its fierce, chilly fascination. At its best the trilogy channels the political passion of “1984,” the memorable violence of “A Clockwork Orange,” the imaginative ambience of “The Chronicles of Narnia” and the detailed inventiveness of “Harry Potter.” The specifics of the dystopian universe, and the fabulous pacing of the complicated plot, give the books their strange, dark charisma. It would take too long to catalog the elaborate gadgets and gizmos and creatures and torments that Collins has devised, but among them are the jabberjays, birds that reproduce the screams of loved ones being tortured, to rattle the tributes; the brilliantly conceived costumes that seem to trail flames as Katniss rides into the arena for her first Hunger Games; an arena in the shape of a lethal ticking clock face; and tracker jackers, genetically altered wasps that can hijack memories and distort them to change the very essence of who a person is.

The trilogy balances seriousness with special effects, a fundamental furious darkness with fast-paced storytelling, so that the books manage to be simultaneously disturbing and fun. They contain a sharp satire of celebrity culture, mindless tabloidism and decadence, as well as crusading teenagers trying to save the world; but they also resist our hunger for clear definitions of good and evil, our sentimental need for a worthwhile cause, our desire for happy or simple endings, or even for the characters we like not to be killed or tortured or battered or bruised in graphic ways. Like the evil Capitol that controls and shadows its world, the trilogy tends to use the things we are attached to against us.

THE 17-year-old girl at the center of the revolution is a great character without being exactly likable. Katniss is bossy, moody, bratty, demanding, prickly. She treats the world with an explosive aggression that is a little out of the ordinary, to say the least. She greets one admirer’s expression of love by knocking him down, slams a door on another’s face during an argument, shoots an arrow at a panel of judges before the Games begin and threatens a mentor with a knife when he says something she doesn’t like. In short, she belongs to a recent tribe of popular heroines: the small, difficult teenage girl who manifests enormous physical and moral strength. She is both murderer and victim, somehow representing female strength and female vulnerability all mingled and entwined, dangerously, ambiguously, into one. She is Pippi Longstocking. She is the girl with the dragon tattoo. She is mesmerizing in her way of defying authority, antisocial, courageous, angry, self-involved and yet somehow sweepingly sympathetic.

Katniss also has not one but two love interests, Peeta and Gale, and she vacillates between them until the very last pages, when she somewhat randomly ends up with one. She can’t choose, and gets sulky when anyone suggests she should. They are both impossibly devoted, brave and handsome, and the narrative never lets either get the upper hand. Indeed, the book’s dogged and perverse resistance of the normal romantic plot in which the heroine genuinely prefers one of her suitors is one of its more appealing and original features.

The entire series, and “Mockingjay” in particular, also offers an investigation of the future frontier of the screen: There are cameras everywhere recording at the outer limits of experience. At one point Katniss says, “I look to the screen, hoping to see them recording some wave of reconciliation going through the crowd. Instead I watch myself get shot on television.” And so there is the plot, and there is the televised version of the plot, the events themselves and the making of propaganda, and in this double storytelling the book makes its weird graceful way toward the denouement. After Katniss’s daring acts of battle, and all varieties of exhaustion and physical disfigurement, her team of stylists is constantly trying to “remake her to Beauty Base Zero” — the way she would look if she got out of bed looking “flawless but natural.” In other words, the books offer a brutal meditation on how absurd and bloody and prurient our worst impulses are for a generation that is interested in the outcome of “America’s Next Top Model.”

Watching young people kill each other might seem a little sick or unhinged, and this is not an author to delicately avert her gaze. Our voyeurism is fully engaged in these books, but so intelligently, adeptly engaged that it does not feel trashy or gratuitous. As Katniss herself says in ­“Mockingjay,” “There are much worse games to play.”

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